On-Site or Off-site? When, Where, Why and How? – Licensed or Qualified Supervision

On-Site or Off-site? When, Where, Why and How? – Licensed or Qualified Supervision

Eye on Florida Laws and Rules Exemptions to Licensure © Catherine L. Waltz, PhD, LCSW July 17, 2014 –Revised and Shared with Beginning Counselors of Florida on October 31, 2014 Frequently I am asked when providing continuing education on any of our required courses, “How do agencies (or programs) have unlicensed employees (or trainees) providing counseling services?”  There is confusion and concern about how this can happen and whether or not the practice is legal.  The practice is legal under the following circumstances.  An additional question is, “How can these agencies have registered interns providing services in settings where a qualified supervisor or other licensed mental health professional is not on site. Our Practice Act, Florida Statute Chapter 491 addresses this matter directly in subsection 491.014 Exemptions.  The first three points address the fact that our Practice Act cannot limit the practice of certain professionals (and religious related service providers) licensed under various other chapters as long as they do not present themselves to the public as licensed in one of our professions (Licensed Clinical Social Work, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist or Licensed Mental Health Counselor) or use our protected titles as noted parenthetically above. Then, the next section addresses the circumstances where individuals are not required to be licensed, provisionally licensed, registered, or certified under Chapter 491.  They are: employees of governmental agencies, developmental disability facilities and programs, a mental health, alcohol, or drug abuse facility operating under chapter 393, chapter 394, or chapter 397; the statewide child care resource and referral network operating under s.0101; a child-placing or child-caring agency licensed pursuant to chapter 409; a domestic...

IMPORTANT UPDATE! On “I want to start a private practice. What do I need to know?”

Eye on Florida Laws and Rules IMPORTANT UPDATE! On “I want to start a private practice.  What do I need to know?” © Catherine L. Waltz, PhD, LCSW October 29, 2014 I’m a Registered Intern; can I have a private practice? These questions and others have been posed to me over the years.  This commentary is an exploration of initial issues related to creating a private practice.  I start with issues of interest to Registered Interns.   Qualified Supervisors and other licensed mental health professionals may be interested to know this information.  That being said, it is imperative that the clinician seeking to establish an independent private practice become familiar with topics related to “formulating, developing, and maintaining business savvy in the provision of professional services” (Woody, 2013).  Some specific costs and procedures related to an independent private practice business are identified to prompt you to consider. Let’s look at the Florida statute regarding Registered Interns and independent private practice.  The quote below is from the section of law for social work practice and we can substitute marriage and family therapy or mental health counselling as the wording is the same. Chapter 491, our practice act states this: 491.005 Licensure by examination.— 491.005(1)(c) . . . “The experience requirement may be met by work performed on or off the premises of the supervising clinical social worker or the equivalent, provided the off-premises work is not the independent private practice rendering of clinical social work that does not have a licensed mental health professional, as determined by the board, on the premises at the same time the intern is providing services.” So,...

I want to start a private practice. What do I need to know?

© Catherine L. Waltz, PhD, LCSW October 19, 2014 I’ve been licensed and working for a while but I really want to be in private practice.  What do I need do first?  I’m a Registered Intern; can I have a private practice? These questions and others have been posed to me over the years.  This commentary is an exploration of initial issues related to creating a private practice.  I start with issues of interest to Registered Interns.   Qualified Supervisors and other licensed mental health professionals may be interested to know this information.  That being said, it is imperative that the clinician seeking to establish an independent private practice become familiar with topics related to “formulating, developing, and maintaining business savvy in the provision of professional services” (Woody, 2013).  Some specific costs and procedures related to an independent private practice business are identified to prompt you to consider. Let’s look at the Florida statute regarding independent private practice.  The quote is from the section of law for social work practice and we can substitute marriage and family therapy or mental health counselling as the wording is the same. Chapter 491, our practice act states this: 491.005 Licensure by examination.— 491.005(1)(c) . . . “The experience requirement may be met by work performed on or off the premises of the supervising clinical social worker or the equivalent, provided the off-premises work is not the independent private practice rendering of clinical social work that does not have a licensed mental health professional, as determined by the board, on the premises at the same time the intern is providing services.” So, what does this...

Plugin by Social Author Bio

%d bloggers like this:
Only Creative Commons


WARNING: All images from Google Images (http://www.google.com/images) have reserved rights, so don't use images without license! Author of plugin are not liable for any damages arising from its use.
Title
Caption
File name
Size
Alignment
Link to
  Open new windows
  Rel nofollow

Skip to toolbar